Blog Post #978 – Average Time Loss Rises in Nova Scotia

Blog Post #978 – Average Time Loss Rises in Nova Scotia

Excerpt from the OH&S Canada magazine

Fewer injuries are happening but when they do, it is taking longer for workers to return to work. This is the findings of the WCB Nova Scotia’s Report to the Community for the second quarter of 2018 released on November 09, 2018.

The length of an average claim and the number of days lost to workplace injury are both increasing. The index used to measure average claim duration increased to 121 days, up from 117 days at the end of 2017.

“Too much time is being lost to injury in our province, and it is holding us back,” says Stuart MacLean, chief executive officer of WCB Nova Scotia. “We all have a role to play in ensuring injured workers are supported as they recover and make safe and timely returns to work. The longer an injured worker stays off the job, the more complex the situation becomes.”

There were 1,343 time-loss injuries from April to June, down slightly from the same period in 2017 when there were 1,351. Time-loss injury rate dropped to 1.73 time-loss injuries per 100 WCB-covered workers in the middle of this year, down from 1.76 at the end of 2017. But acute fatalities over the first two quarters increased over last year with nine fatalities. This year also marks a tragic year in fishing and construction.

“No one should die as a result of their work,” MacLean says. “The increased in 2018 speaks to the need for continued work by all of us to keep Nova Scotians safe on the job.”

My opinion

I was very glad to hear that there are fewer injuries in our sister province of Nova Scotia but was sadden to learn that the injuries caused longer time off from the job. This causes strain on the worker and his/her family as well as stress on the behalf of the employer to aid the worker in the effort to speed up the process.

The reporting requirements may also have been changed as it has been in Ontario so numbers look better here but the incidents/accidents may be happening all the same but are not readily reported. All we can go by is the bottom line and the actual workers getting hurt. I find that the worker fatalities and critical injuries are still going up so where do we, as safety professionals go the ensure the numbers are reduced; education, training requirements, hazard analyses or legislative changes? All would be a step in the right direction.

Ensure your workplace is a safe place.

Remember – In Ontario, “ALL Accidents are Preventable”

‘Work’ and ‘Play’ safe.

Daniel L. Beal

CHSEP – Advanced Level
VP & Senior Trainer
HRS Group Inc.

 

Dan
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