Excerpt from the OH&S Canada magazine

firefighters in Newfoundland and Labrador are looking forward to legislative changes that will allow them to claim workers’ compensation for cancer in the future, after a report by the province’s Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Commission (WHSCC) recommends that cancer be considered a workplace hazard for career firefighters.

A faulty gas-monitoring sensor is believed to have contributed to an incident in which 18 workers were exposed to a potentially deadly gas at a copper and zinc mine near Millertown, Newfoundland.

At about 8:05 pm on January 4, a half-hour into the night shift, employees of the Duck Pond Mine were working 250 metres below surface when one miner reported smelling gas, says Larry Bartlett, human resources superintendent for mine owner, Teck Cominco Ltd.

I have had the honour of suggesting changes in the Ontario, as well as the rest of Canada, health and safety legislation. The previous 99 blogs deal with Canadian content, specifically those in Ontario.

I thought it appropriate to complete the 100th blog with a recent example of an accident in the Galveston , Texas area. It just goes to show that health and safety in a 24/7 responsibility and occupational accidents have no borders.

I do not know the legislation and what laws are broken and it is my hope that someone from the great state of Texas will fill our readers in. Is it covered under Federal or State law? If I receive any follow-up on this particular incident I will forward it to the readers.

Thank you all for the dedicated readership during the first 100 blogs. The comments number over 6,900 as of today’s date, June 26, 2011 and it is my sincere wish to continue to provide quality blogs on health and safety for a long time to come.

Daniel L. Beal
Senior Trainer for HRS Group Inc.
Vice President