I have had the honour of suggesting changes in the Ontario, as well as the rest of Canada, health and safety legislation. The previous 99 blogs deal with Canadian content, specifically those in Ontario.

I thought it appropriate to complete the 100th blog with a recent example of an accident in the Galveston , Texas area. It just goes to show that health and safety in a 24/7 responsibility and occupational accidents have no borders.

I do not know the legislation and what laws are broken and it is my hope that someone from the great state of Texas will fill our readers in. Is it covered under Federal or State law? If I receive any follow-up on this particular incident I will forward it to the readers.

Thank you all for the dedicated readership during the first 100 blogs. The comments number over 6,900 as of today’s date, June 26, 2011 and it is my sincere wish to continue to provide quality blogs on health and safety for a long time to come.

Daniel L. Beal
Senior Trainer for HRS Group Inc.
Vice President

The first thing every employer needs to understand is that there is, without question, a legal duty to safeguard workers against the risks of heat stress. Seven provinces/territories (BC, NB, NL, PE, QC, SK and YT) include in their OHS regulations specific measures that employers must take to protect workers against heat stress. For example, Part 7 of the B.C. OHS Regulation requires employers to:

– Limit workers’ exposure to excessive heat;
– Conduct heat stress assessments to determine workers’ risks of hazardous exposure;
– Put into place a heat stress exposure control plan; and
– Implement engineering and administrative controls.https://www.hrsgroup.com/blog/heat-stress-the-law/

strong>Excerpt from the OH&S Canada magazine

Written by Jason Contant – Editor of the magazine

Employers in the Yukon who fail to notify the territory’s workers’ compensation board of their compliance with written safety orders should expect to take it on the chin financially.

Since June 1, employers who do not provide the Yukon Workers’ Compensation Health and Safety Board in Whitehorse with a compliance update by the deadline provided have left themselves open to a financial hit. An immediate $250 penalty will be applied, notes a statement from the safety body.

strong>Excerpt From the OH&S Magazine – April 2010

The British Columbia operator of a remote copper-gold mine in the Yukon has shut the doors to two bunkhouse units after mould was discovered in their bathrooms.

The mould was identified in mid-February during a joint health and safety committee inspection of the Minto Mine work camp near the Yukon community of Carmacks. Vancouver-based Capstone Mining Corp. Opted to close the units pending completion of an environmental hygiene assessment. When they looked at the washrooms and opened up a couple of walls, there was a significant mould problem.